Uncertain Citizenship: Jewish Belonging and the “Ethnic Revolution” in Poland and Czechoslovakia, 1937-1947

Sarah Cramsey 04-05.JPG

The possibility for a specific type of east central European citizenship that transcended ethnic belonging came to an end by 1948. This revolution in understandings of who belonged to a Czechoslovak, a Polish a German or a Jewish citizenry unleashed massive demographic changes in a region historically known for its ethnic coexistence. As a consequence, millions of people and hundreds of thousands of “national Jews” left homes, fields, villages, neighbors and former lives during and after Hitler’s total war to live in a presumed ethnic homeland elsewhere. "Uncertain Citizenship: Jewish Belonging and the “Ethnic Revolution” in Poland and Czechoslovakia, 1938‐1948" maps this redefinition of citizenship and this unprecedented nationalization of space from a novel angle. In this way, a study exploring how ideas changed regarding where Jews belonged becomes a synecdoche for understanding the most important trajectory of the Europe’s 20th century: the consolidation of ethnically homogeneous nation states in a region once marked by spectacular heterogeneity.

Intervenant(s)

Sarah Cramsey, Department of Jewish Studies, Tulane University.

Organisateur(s)

MMC (Centre de recherche Mondes Modernes et Contemporains)

Titre

Uncertain Citizenship: Jewish Belonging and the “Ethnic Revolution” in Poland and Czechoslovakia, 1937-1947

Identifiant

uncertain-citizenship-jewish-belonging-and-Ethnic-Revolution-in-Poland-and-Czechoslovakia-1937-1947-Sarah-Cramsey

Type

Séminaire

Date

27/04/2018

Texte

The possibility for a specific type of east central European citizenship that transcended ethnic belonging came to an end by 1948. This revolution in understandings of who belonged to a Czechoslovak, a Polish a German or a Jewish citizenry unleashed massive demographic changes in a region historically known for its ethnic coexistence. As a consequence, millions of people and hundreds of thousands of “national Jews” left homes, fields, villages, neighbors and former lives during and after Hitler’s total war to live in a presumed ethnic homeland elsewhere. "Uncertain Citizenship: Jewish Belonging and the “Ethnic Revolution” in Poland and Czechoslovakia, 1938‐1948" maps this redefinition of citizenship and this unprecedented nationalization of space from a novel angle. In this way, a study exploring how ideas changed regarding where Jews belonged becomes a synecdoche for understanding the most important trajectory of the Europe’s 20th century: the consolidation of ethnically homogeneous nation states in a region once marked by spectacular heterogeneity.

Intervenant(s)

Sarah Cramsey, Department of Jewish Studies, Tulane University.

Heure

12h à 14h (Attention au changement de date!!!)

Lieu

ULB - Campus du Solbosch
Bâtiment NA, niveau 4, salle NA4.302

Inscription

Entrée libre, inscription souhaitée (mmc@ulb.ac.be)

Organisateur(s)

MMC (Centre de recherche Mondes Modernes et Contemporains)

Collection

Citer ce document

“Uncertain Citizenship: Jewish Belonging and the “Ethnic Revolution” in Poland and Czechoslovakia, 1937-1947,” Centre de Recherche Mondes Modernes et Contemporains, consulté le 23 juillet 2018, https://mmc.ulb.ac.be/agenda/uncertain-citizenship-jewish-belonging-and-Ethnic-Revolution-in-Poland-and-Czechoslovakia-1937-1947-Sarah-Cramsey.

Dernière mise à jour : 12 avr. 2018.